Tassie Trip Day 4: Seahorse World

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It is estimated that over 20 million seahorses are taken from the wild each year, predominantly for traditional Chinese medicine.

Seahorse Australia was initially created to farm seahorses to supply to the Traditional Chinese Medicine market to try to reduce the pressure on wild seahorses being fished.  Monetary issues came into play and over the years this has changed to breeding seahorses for aquariums and pet wholesalers around the world.  The focus is now on seahorse breeding, education and conservation.

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Seahorses are basically a tiny fish.  They were named because of the shape of their head which looks like …..  well it’s pretty obvious isn’t it!  These really are the cutest little creatures around.

We had no idea there was even a place called Seahorse World until a week or so before we left for Tasmania when we saw one of our fellow Instagram followers post that they had visited.  Of course we were intrigued and asked for details and made it a must visit place on our trip.

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When you enter Seahorse World you are taken on a guided tour around the facility and learn all about these amazing magical creatures.

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The first room you enter has numerous different coloured seahorse and it is in here that you start to learn a little about the amazing little seahorse.

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Next you enter the ‘working’ seahorse farm, where you see how they feed them and can see the seahorses in all stages of life.  The babies are so unbelievably tiny.

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Yes they are baby seahorse!

The final room is a showcase of some of the other sea life found around Tasmanian waters, including a huge crab which George wanted to take home for dinner!  We even got to hold a little seahorse which was pretty cool.

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Did you know….

  • Seahorses have a prehensile tail which is similar to that of a monkeys’ and can pick up or hold on to anything.
  • The fin on their back is called a dorsal fin and propels them forward and they maintain their balance with small pectoral fins situated on either side of the back of their head.
  • They have the ability to change colour to blend into their surroundings.

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Did you know….

  • The male seahorse is the one that will carry the eggs. He will have them in his body for up to 45 days and then they will emerge full-grown.  These tiny baby seahorses will all then float together clinging to each by their tails as they try to find their food and hide from the many predators trying to eat them!
  • You can tell the difference from the males and females by looking at the abdominal area. The males have a smooth area with a pouch. That is where the eggs will be deposited. Females have a pointed stomach that is rough.
  • They are vertebrates due to the fact that all seahorses feature an internal skeleton.

 


Attraction Information:  Seahorse World is open 7 days a week and is a 45min drive north of Launceston.  Your entry fee includes a 45 minute guided tour where you see many, many seahorses and learn about these mysterious creatures.

Website: https://seahorseworld.com.au/

Address:  200 Flinders Street, Beauty Point

Telephone:  03 6383 4111

*Seahorse World and Platypus House are located next to each other.  You can purchase a ‘Tamar Triple Pass’ which gives you access to Seahorse World, Platypus House and Beaconsfield Mine & Heritage Centre and offers a large saving on entry fees.

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Exploring the inland tracks 

Tuesday morning saw us say goodbye to Lauren, Liam, Tas and Ash as they started their journey back to Sydney.  We had a great couple of days with them playing tour guides for their first visit to Fraser Island!

After saying our goodbyes we decided to explore a few of the inland tracks at the southern end of the island and first stop was Tobys Gap Airstrip.  We aren’t sure if this Airstrip is ever used anymore, but we certainty wouldn’t want to be landing on it! It’s certainly a lot more overgrown than it was last time we visited.

The track then lead us around to Deep Creek and Ungowa. Deep Creek has great views over the western side of the island and you can also see another shipwreck from here.

The tracks weren’t very popular and we didn’t see another car in 2 1/2 hours driving, which is just how we like it!  The boat ramp and jetty at Ungowa aren’t exactly in good condition!

Walking down the jetty to take photographs was a balancing act of trying not to fall through the wooden planks!  Oh and if you ever visit this area, lather up in insect spray beforehand, they are fierce around here!

After a day of driving the tracks we were glad to get back to the eastern beach. The inland tracks are very bumpy and slow going, and on this day it involved dodging many trees and branches on the track as well, at times you are lucky to even reach the inland track speed limit of 30km / hour.

Once we reached the beach we stopped for lunch and found this little guy sitting in the sand.  ​​First time we’d seen one outside of an aquarium.

Later in the afternoon we took a drive down to the shipwreck to take some photos in the days fading light. We got some great photos, but of course this mean driving back to camp in the dark, not really fun at all!  The video below shows just a short section of the drive back to camp.​