The most remote music concert in the world

Guess what! …. in exactly 14 days we leave home bound for The Big Red Bash! Many of you are probably asking “wtf is The Big Red Bash” …. well let us explain.

The Big Red Bash is the world’s most remote music concert. It is a unique outback experience where over 10,000 people flock to Birdsville in outback Queensland to attend a 3 day concert. Most people camp onsite for the duration of the concert (and the days before and after in some cases). The concert and camp area, known as Bashville, are located on a privately owned organic cattle station called Adria Downs.

The camping area sits on the dried-out bed of an ancient lake with the giant red sand dune, the famous “Big Red” (the highest sand dune in the Simpson Desert) as a backdrop.

The first Big Red Bash was held in 2013 and it’s grown significantly in popularity since then. It’s been on our bucket list since 2013 (well Shelly’s bucket list anyway, and finally she’s convinced George that we really do need to go!)

This year the headliners are MIDNIGHT OIL! Yes we are just a little bit excited! Shelly last saw Midnight Oil when they performed as part of the M-One concert in Sydney back in 2002, so it’s been quite a while!

This will be Midnight Oil’s first first multi day Australian music festival in over 22 years.

Over the three days, from mid afternoon each day we will be entertained by the following artists, finishing up on the last night with Midnight Oil. According to the organisers, the 40 meter high Big Red Dune will light up, and the full moon will rise up from the desert dunes during their set.

  • The Living End
  • Kasey Chambers
  • Richard Clapton
  • 1927
  • Busby Marou
  • Bjorn Again
  • Wendy Matthews
  • Mark Gable (The Choirboys)
  • Steve Kilbey (The Church)
  • Eurogliders
  • Chocolate Starfish
  • Neil Murray
  • Steve Balbi (Noiseworks)
  • The Chantoozies
  • Mark Williams (Dragon)
  • Dale Ryder (ex Boom Crash Opera)

Every year, various iconic Aussie musicians head to the bash to perform. The website states that As legendary Aussie artists fill the desert air with their classic sounds, your memories of this magical event will last a life-time. Or if you’re lucky – until the next Bash!

From what we’ve heard, once you experience your first Big Red Bash, it won’t be your last, so who knows, we could be back again next year!

So whilst we most likely won’t have reception at the concert, we will be taking plenty of photos and videos of the concert and the trip there and back to share with everyone.


Source, photo is from Outback Queensland website

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Saying goodbye to ‘The Old Girl’

Many of you may know that we recently purchased a new 4WD for Shelly …. and unfortunately that meant that the old Prado needed to find a new home. We’d had this for sale for a while and we always knew that a vehicle like this would have to attract the right buyer. For a start, not everyone wants to buy a 23 year old car with nearly 300,000 km on the clock! We’d spent a lot of money on this 4WD over the years and it was in great condition for a vehicle of that age. Of course it had the odd scratch and dent, but it’s lived a fairly active off-road life, so what do you really expect!

Anyway, that right buyer did come along, a young guy and his family from the central west region of NSW. He’d done his homework, he’d seen our website and knew exactly the life this car had lived, there was now no hiding anything! They took the drive down to our house on a Thursday night to check out the Prado, George went over every single thing on the car, explained how everything worked, why we’d done what we’d done or used the parts we had, what had been replaced, what maybe needs to be looked at ….. we even gave instructions on how to pull apart the console and fix the 4WD shifter when it sometimes jumps out of place!

So after about 1 1/2 hours or so, we loaded the Prado with all it’s spare parts, the old back seats, the old stock wheels and we said goodbye and watched as she drove away with her new family.

Last photo, just before she drove away.

It was sad to see her go, she’d brought us so many years of memories. She was what started our whole 4WDing and travel adventures together. George owned the Prado when we met, it was this Prado that got George into 4WDing in the beginning. He’d researched for ages to find the perfect vehicle and this is where it all started.

When we first started travelling we slept in the back of the Prado, free camping or staying in caravan parks as we traveled around.

All of the dogs have gone 4WDing with us and love nothing more than a day in the bush, they all started off in the old girl.

Kayla, Shelly’s old dog, loved being introduced to 4WDing
Gelly & Charli have been 4WDing with us since they were pups and they absolutely love it.

The kids grew up knowing this car, Shelly learned to drive off-road in the Prado, she took us on so many amazing holidays and to places across Australia that we would never have gone to without a 4WD. We spent our 2 month honeymoon travelling in the Prado! Our first Cape York trip, we tackled the Old Tele Track by ourselves and without winching – even the new Prado needed to be winched out of Palm Creek!

Old Tele Track, Cape York
The Lions Den Hotel, FNQ
Our two Prado’s together on our New Years Eve trip to Cameron Corner

Lots of fun weekend trips with friends, getting stuck for hours in the Watagans at night! repairing the 4WD shifter in the middle of Stockton Beach!, pulling the Patrol out every time it goes near water (sorry Liam!)

At the end of the day, it was time for the Prado to go, but it was sad, a lot of memories drove away with that car. But hopefully the old girl still has a lot of life left in her and this new young family can start making memories of their own.

Interesting little fact is that this Prado was originally owned by a Doctor in Dubbo, she then came to Sydney to live 19 years of her life with us, so i guess it’s only fitting that she’s returning back to the country to live out her days.

Help Us Help The Farmers

Australian’s are no strangers to extreme weather conditions. Each year we are faced with extreme heat, floods, bush fires and of course, drought.  This past few months have been particularly bad, with all these events happening simultaneously in various locations across the country.

Unfortunately drought is part of life for many people living on the land.  As if life isn’t hard enough for some people, they are then faced with the ongoing drought and all the effects that come with that.  People are dealing with the heartbreak of watching their stock die from lack of food or water, struggling to feed themselves and sometimes being forced to make the difficult decision of selling up and moving off the land, sometimes after the family has resided there for hundreds of years.  Facing these stark realities is leading to severe depression and, unfortunately in many cases, suicide.

As most of us live in the city and don’t see the effects of the drought on a daily basis, it’s easy to block it out and pretend it isn’t happening, but believe us, this is real.

Anyone who knows us knows that we love to travel and spend a lot of time in the outback and have seen first-hand the effect this drought is having on our beautiful country and its people. During our travels we’ve spoken to those affected and it’s heartbreaking to hear stories of no rain or no feed for their stock, having to destroy, sell or give away stock and working dogs …. not to mention the impact this all has on one’s mental state of mind. Farmers are having to resort to roadside grazing their cattle on the side of public roads as they are literally starving as they have no feed available or the owners simply cannot afford to feed them. We personally have family living on the land and they too are suffering. It really is far worse than most people realise.

We personally donate to various charities, but this particular one, Rural Aid, provides a holistic support program to rural Australia. They run the “Buy a Bale” campaign, in which donations help purchase and distribute fodder, hampers and more. They also run other programs such as Farm Rescue, Weekend Warriors, The Farm Army, all of which do a great deal to help our struggling farmers.

These rural communities need our support and we all need to stick together and support each other through these tough times, so anything that you can give, whether it’s $2, $20 or $200, would be greatly appreciated. Don’t forget, any donations over $2 are tax deductible.

-CLICK HERE TO DONATE-

We have a new name!

Ok so just a quick post to let you all know that we have a new name! We are now known as ⬇️

But don’t worry, nothing else has changed, we are still the same old George and Shelly and we will still be sharing all our stories and photos of our life and travels as we always have.

Thanks to all of our family, friends and followers for your support and encouragement with all of our adventures. We love sharing our stories with you and if we inspire others to get out there and travel, then we have done our job!