Tassie Trip Day 4: Seahorse World

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It is estimated that over 20 million seahorses are taken from the wild each year, predominantly for traditional Chinese medicine.

Seahorse Australia was initially created to farm seahorses to supply to the Traditional Chinese Medicine market to try to reduce the pressure on wild seahorses being fished.  Monetary issues came into play and over the years this has changed to breeding seahorses for aquariums and pet wholesalers around the world.  The focus is now on seahorse breeding, education and conservation.

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Seahorses are basically a tiny fish.  They were named because of the shape of their head which looks like …..  well it’s pretty obvious isn’t it!  These really are the cutest little creatures around.

We had no idea there was even a place called Seahorse World until a week or so before we left for Tasmania when we saw one of our fellow Instagram followers post that they had visited.  Of course we were intrigued and asked for details and made it a must visit place on our trip.

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When you enter Seahorse World you are taken on a guided tour around the facility and learn all about these amazing magical creatures.

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The first room you enter has numerous different coloured seahorse and it is in here that you start to learn a little about the amazing little seahorse.

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Next you enter the ‘working’ seahorse farm, where you see how they feed them and can see the seahorses in all stages of life.  The babies are so unbelievably tiny.

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Yes they are baby seahorse!

The final room is a showcase of some of the other sea life found around Tasmanian waters, including a huge crab which George wanted to take home for dinner!  We even got to hold a little seahorse which was pretty cool.

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Did you know….

  • Seahorses have a prehensile tail which is similar to that of a monkeys’ and can pick up or hold on to anything.
  • The fin on their back is called a dorsal fin and propels them forward and they maintain their balance with small pectoral fins situated on either side of the back of their head.
  • They have the ability to change colour to blend into their surroundings.

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Did you know….

  • The male seahorse is the one that will carry the eggs. He will have them in his body for up to 45 days and then they will emerge full-grown.  These tiny baby seahorses will all then float together clinging to each by their tails as they try to find their food and hide from the many predators trying to eat them!
  • You can tell the difference from the males and females by looking at the abdominal area. The males have a smooth area with a pouch. That is where the eggs will be deposited. Females have a pointed stomach that is rough.
  • They are vertebrates due to the fact that all seahorses feature an internal skeleton.

 


Attraction Information:  Seahorse World is open 7 days a week and is a 45min drive north of Launceston.  Your entry fee includes a 45 minute guided tour where you see many, many seahorses and learn about these mysterious creatures.

Website: https://seahorseworld.com.au/

Address:  200 Flinders Street, Beauty Point

Telephone:  03 6383 4111

*Seahorse World and Platypus House are located next to each other.  You can purchase a ‘Tamar Triple Pass’ which gives you access to Seahorse World, Platypus House and Beaconsfield Mine & Heritage Centre and offers a large saving on entry fees.

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2 thoughts on “Tassie Trip Day 4: Seahorse World

  1. Hopefully, the wild seahorses can be saved, conserved and preserved from extinction. That Chinese “medicine” is also responsible for the poaching in far off Africa of rhinos and elephants. The rhinos are in serious decline.

    Like

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